Sick proof of concept – Petition at 15K to remake Mortal Kombat Trilogy

Sick proof of concept – Petition at 15K to remake Mortal Kombat Trilogy

Eyeballistic Games has a dream: it wants to remake Mortal Kombat Trilogy, and in 2016, Mortal Kombat co-creator Ed Boon already gave his support to the project.

Unfortunately, according to the creator, IP owner Warner Bros. did not feel the game would sell more than 100,000 copies globally, deeming it unprofitable. However, in the five years since then, Eyeballistic has solidified its position and is ready to show its worth. In reality, Eyeballistic currently wants to rebuild Mortal Kombat Trilogy using Unreal Engine 5, has built a few proofs of concept for it, and has begun a petition to show Warner Bros. the desire for such a project. The petition has received over 15,000 signatures already.

Petition time

In the petition, Eyeballistic has been quite precise about its goals: It plans to release a Mortal Kombat Trilogy UE5 remake for $39.99 for Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 5, Xbox One X, and PC, including online matchmaking, worldwide leaderboards, and seamless rollback-enabled online play, as well as 4K quality and 60 frames per second when appropriate. Once the petition has gathered 100,000 signatures, the plan is to contact Warner Bros. with it, and then maybe utilize crowdfunding to further establish interest for the game.

video

Get it over here!!!

Eyeballistic has developed a few proof-of-concept videos for a Mortal Kombat Trilogy remake that are both exceedingly simple and aesthetically gorgeous. As can be seen it is simply Scorpion and Baraka in a relatively static scene, standing stationary but making idle gestures – yet it looks fantastic. And, at this point, that’s more than enough to pique people’s interest.

If you wish to see a Mortal Kombat Trilogy UE5 remake on contemporary platforms, sign the petition here; https://www.change.org/p/ben-bell-kickstart-campaign-for-mortal-kombat-trilogy-remake-with-ue5 . The game originally debuted in 1996 on the PlayStation 1 and Nintendo 64, and its greatest claim to fame was its large selection of characters and stages at the time.

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